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DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.2096-5796.21.00027

Effects of virtual environment and self-representations on perception and physical performance in redirected jumping

Abstract

Background Redirected jumping (RDJ) allows users to explore virtual environments (VEs) naturally by scaling a small real-world jump to a larger virtual jump with virtual camera motion manipulation, thereby addressing the problem of limited physical space in VR applications. Previous RDJ studies have mainly focused on detection threshold estimation. However, the effect VE or selfrepresentation (SR) has on the perception or performance of RDJs remains unclear. Methods In this paper, we report experiments to measure the perception (detection thresholds for gains, presence, embodiment, intrinsic motivation, and cybersickness) and physical performance (heart rate intensity, preparation time, and actual jumping distance) of redirected forward jumping under six different combinations of VE (low and high visual richness) and SRs (invisible, shoes, and human-like). Results Our results indicated that the detection threshold ranges for horizontal translation gains were significantly smaller in the VE with high rather than low visual richness. When different SRs were applied, our results did not suggest significant differences in detection thresholds, but it did report longer actual jumping distances in the invisible body case compared with the other two SRs. In the high visual richness VE, the preparation time for jumping with a human-like avatar was significantly longer than that with other SRs. Finally, some correlations were found between perception and physical performance measures. Conclusions All these findings suggest that both VE and SRs influence users' perception and performance in RDJ and must be considered when designing locomotion techniques.

Cite this article

Yijun LI, Miao WANG, Derong JIN, Frank STEINICKE, Shimin HU, Qinping ZHAO. Effects of virtual environment and self-representations on perception and physical performance in redirected jumping. Virtual Reality & Intelligent Hardware DOI:10.3724/SP.J.2096-5796.21.00027